Archive for Science

Lexus Hoverboard

Posted in Science by Olivia Olson on August 5th, 2015

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Lexus just unveiled its new Lexus Hoverboard. Yes, Lexus, the car company, just unveiled a hoverboard inspired by the 1989 film, Back to the Future II. We’re one step closer to experiencing the 2015 Marty McFly did. Unlike Marty’s hoverboard, this one can only be ridden in a specially designed skate park in Barcelona so far.
The board works by using magnets that are surrounded by liquid nitrogen and kept at -197 degrees Fahrenheit. “The magnetic field from the track is effectively ‘frozen’ into the superconductors in the board, maintaining the distance between the board and the track—essentially keeping the board hovering,” Oliver de Haas, CEO of GmbH, told the press during a press release “This force is strong enough to allow the rider to stand and even jump on the board.”

You may be thinking “Great Scott! Where can I …

Advancements in Multispectral Imaging Reveal New Texts

Posted in Science by Olivia Olson on August 5th, 2015

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NBC News released an article about recent developments in multispectral imaging. Many scientists are working frantically to use this technology to reveal hidden texts, that within a few years could have easily been lost forever. It has already been used to uncover poems written by William Faulkner and maps potentially used by Columbus. This method has the potential to uncover many other pieces of music, Biblical gospels, and so many other writings that haven’t been read for centuries.

Multispectral images are used to capture images and data at different frequencies across a spectrum. It uses different frequencies to reveal different forms of ink and materials. So when images are processed using this method, it reveals the writing that was previously thought to have been destroyed or damaged beyond legibility.
The NBC article states “The problem is that so few people are skilled …

Data Scientist Assesses Rappers Vocab

Posted in Science by Darrin Olson on May 6th, 2014

Unique Words By RapperRecently, a data scientist named Matt Daniels with interests in rap combined with skills with javascript created a nice visual chart to see who was the most garrulous word-slinger in the game. The chart is designed to show the number of unique words used by rappers and compare them against one another, with the works of Shakespeare thrown in as a benchmark.

Google Maps Street View Go Underwater

Posted in Science by Tam Yue on March 8th, 2014

Catlin Seaview Survey teamIt will come as no shock to anyone to hear that the world’s coral reefs are in a state of decline. A company in Austrailia called Catlin Seaview Survey is going around the world documenting coral reefs with a 360-degree panoramic SVII camera highlighting what reefs look like now compared to what they will look like in a few years.

What does this have to do with Google Maps Street View? Well, Catlin Seaview Survey is going to take its camera underwater along the coast in Australia from Manly to Bronte. From there they will team up with Google so we can all have a look under the water in Australia. They hope to use the images for scientific research as well as educating us about the beautiful underwater world that lives along their coastline.

Grad Student’s AMAZING cover of “Bohemian Rhapsody”

Posted in music,Science,Uncategorized by Tam Yue on September 24th, 2013

Bohemian Rhapsody Cover for String TheoryGet your notebooks out, class is about to start.  Nerds are cool….nothing else to say here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rjbtsX7twc

Metallic Velcro is super strong

Posted in Science by Shane McGlaun on July 13th, 2010

Velcro is one of the best inventions ever. It allows us to wear shoes that don’t need tied, keep swimsuits fastened without zippers or buttons, and hand stuff on the wall and still be able to get it down easily.

Velcro would be great in many industrial uses too, if it could withstand heat and chemicals. A new metallic Velcro has been spied that has hooks and loops made from metal. The stuff is crazy strong.

US detonated massive hydrogen bomb over pacific in 1962

Posted in Science by Shane McGlaun on July 5th, 2010

All most of us know about nuclear explosions today comes from the 60′s and movies. Back during the cold war, kids in school had bomb drills, which were weird considering the radiation could make it under your desk.

A new photo and story has surfaced that occurred back in 1962. The US strapped a hydrogen bomb to a rocket and fired it 250 miles above the Pacific Ocean. The bomb used was 1000 times more powerful than the one that leveled Hiroshima.

Space Probe to Return with Asteroid Sample

Posted in Science by Darrin Olson on June 13th, 2010

Hayabusa probeA space probe launched by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is expected to land in the Australian outback late Sunday after a seven-year journey to a nearby asteroid. Scientists hope the probe will be carrying a sample from the asteroid which will mark the first time a spacecraft has returned to Earth with samples other than from the Earth’s moon.

The probe named Hayabusa landed on the asteroid Itokawa two times in 2005 and after its long return journey will be landing a remote desert in Australia. Among the team to find and recover the probe will be indigenous Aboriginal elders to ensure that the landing of the device did not damage any sacred grounds.

Monkey passes glowing gene to offspring in research milestone

Posted in Science by Darrin Olson on May 28th, 2009

Monkey with glowing green feet passes gene to offspring.In an article published Wednesday in Nature, researches in Japan reported the successful passing of a transgene from a primate to its offspring, marking a milestone in this type of research. In the study the scientists injected a number of marmoset embryos with a manufactured virus which contained a gene that would be inserted into the animals DNA, making their feet glow green under ultraviolet light.

NASA looking to give away Space Shuttles

Posted in Science by Darrin Olson on December 19th, 2008

NASA looking to possibly give away Space ShuttlesNASA has announced that they are looking for ideas on what to do with the two space shuttle orbiters and main engine display kits by issuing a Request For Information (RFI) to the public. If you can convince them that you can appropriately display the shuttle to the public along with having enough money to transport and store them then you may have a good chance and scoring your own space shuttle from NASA.

Large Hadron Collider not colliding until Spring

Posted in Science by Darrin Olson on September 23rd, 2008

Large Hadron Collider operations held until April of next year.Officials at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) announced on Tuesday that the world’s biggest physics experiments will be on hold until April. This comes as result of recent large, unexpected helium leak into a sector of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

Earlier this month CERN had its first successful test run of the LHC by sending a beam of protons clockwise through a 17 mile ring making up the system. The next steps were to send the proton beam counter-clockwise through the LHC, and then eventually send beams in both directions having them collide in an attempt to study new forms of matter that could not be studied in any other existing machine.

Research into the helium leak has shown that the likely cause was electrical connections between two of the superconducting electromagnets which caused a …

Large Hadron Collider has successful test run

Posted in News,Science by Darrin Olson on September 10th, 2008

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a successful test runIn what is probably the biggest physics experiment in history, today marks the first successful test of the Large Hadron Collidor in Geneva by sending a beam of protons through the the entire underground ring that makes up the world’s largest particle collider. The beam sent through travels through the 17 mile underground ring and nearly the speed of light and can make 11,000 laps through the tube every second.

Officials with CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) dubbed the test a success today and the next step will be to send a beam of protons through the tunnel in the opposite direction. Today’s beam went clockwise and the next trial will be to send the beam counter-clockwise.

If successful then the team will be able to work towards the ultimate goal of sending protons through the tunnel in both …

New hand sensor system gives you better beer handling

Posted in Science by Nino Marchetti on July 3rd, 2008

Pressure Profile Systems FingerTPS

A sensor-based idea first drawn up and tested in the Harvard University Robotics Lab and originally funded by DARPA research grants has now found its way to market. It is called the Pressure Profile Systems FingerTPS and you’ll find it pricing around $5,000 for a single-hand system.

The Pressure Profile Systems FingerTPS, as you can see from the photo, places flexible sensors on select parts of the hand to “transmit accurate, repeatable tactile force data to a PC via wireless Bluetooth connection.” The maker says this data, integrated with video, “provides a complete representation of user interaction with tools, sports equipment, new
product designs, or medical applications.”

Google co-founder books space flight

Posted in Science by Darrin Olson on June 12th, 2008

Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google, trains for a space flight in zero gravity.According to the Space Adventures tourism company out of Virginia, Sergy Brin, cofounder of Google, has put a $5 million deposit down for a vacation in space aboard a Russian spacecraft. The total trip will cost $35 million dollars and the launch date is scheduled for sometime in 2011.

Brin joins a small number of elite individuals who have both the desire to travel into space and more importantly the deep pockets to make it happen. Richard Garriott’s trip with Space Adventures is still coming up this fall. Brin’s $5 million deposit also makes him the founding member of a new Space Adventure club called the Orbital Mission Explorers Circle. The membership appears to work something like a vacation timeshare, but for space. Brin and any other new members that join get preferential options to the mission seats or can sell the seat to another space traveler if there schedule just doesn’t allow for traveling to space that day.

Phoenix Mars spacecraft makes safe Mars landing

Posted in Science by Darrin Olson on May 25th, 2008

NASA’s Phoenix Mars confirms safe landing on MarsAfter over three years of direct planning and ten months of traveling through space, NASA’s Phoenix Mars spacecraft today sent back signals that it has made a safe landing on the surface of Mars. The Phoenix spacecraft appears to have hit the intended target in the icy area of Mars’ arctic circle.

Signals sent from Phoenix were delayed by 15 minutes as they were routed through the Odyssey satellite currently orbiting Mars and back to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Earth which caused the celebrations of steps of the landings to take place shortly after they actually happened on Mars.